Category Archives: Memorials

Monumental Children Return to Meet Their Saviour at Liverpool St

Flor Kent’s much admired sculpture “Fur Das Kind” has returned to Liverpool Street Station.

These two haunting figures are a memorial to the WWII Kindertransport rescue of children, partly made possible by Sir Nicholas Winton’s  missions, during which 669 children of mostly Jewish origin were saved.
This year marks the 70th anniversary of the “Winton Train” which brought children from Prague to London.
Last Saturday, the 21st May, Sir Nicholas Winton was met at Liverpool Street station by descendants of the real-life rescued “children” together with their families who had arrived on a special steam locomotive that had just retraced the original route. He duly rededicated the statue in the week of his 102nd birthday! An amazing and inspirational man, more about him and his work here.
The original statue was dedicated in 2003. In that version the girl stood next to a glass suitcase, which  contained objects that the real children had brought with them to England. Problems with conserving the objects and the need for planning permission to be granted to add the figure of the boy have caused the delays in it’s return. Photos of the statue in it’s 2003 incarnation from “The Poor Mouth” Blog here.
The statues are part of an international network of commemoration, which also includes Für Das Kind/ For The Child- Vienna in Westbahnhof Station,  Pro Dite / For The Child- Prague in the Central Hlavni Nadrazi, the Für Das Kind Collection of Original Objects at the Imperial War Museum and  the Für Das Kind International Travelling Exhibition.
The very high winds last week damaged an exhibition also timed to coincide with this event. “Winton’s Trains” was due to have opened for a month in the Bishopsgate entrance to the station. It is currently being rescheduled details here http://www.wintonstrain.com/
I think we owe it to all concerned, to visit the exhibition as soon as it re-opens.

Monumental Children Return to Meet Their Saviour at Liverpool St

Flor Kent’s much admired sculpture “Fur Das Kind” has returned to Liverpool Street Station.

These two haunting figures are a memorial to the WWII Kindertransport rescue of children, partly made possible by Sir Nicholas Winton’s  missions, during which 669 children of mostly Jewish origin were saved.
This year marks the 70th anniversary of the “Winton Train” which brought children from Prague to London.
Last Saturday, the 21st May, Sir Nicholas Winton was met at Liverpool Street station by descendants of the real-life rescued “children” together with their families who had arrived on a special steam locomotive that had just retraced the original route. He duly rededicated the statue in the week of his 102nd birthday! An amazing and inspirational man, more about him and his work here.
The original statue was dedicated in 2003. In that version the girl stood next to a glass suitcase, which  contained objects that the real children had brought with them to England. Problems with conserving the objects and the need for planning permission to be granted to add the figure of the boy have caused the delays in it’s return. Photos of the statue in it’s 2003 incarnation from “The Poor Mouth” Blog here.
The statues are part of an international network of commemoration, which also includes Für Das Kind/ For The Child- Vienna in Westbahnhof Station,  Pro Dite / For The Child- Prague in the Central Hlavni Nadrazi, the Für Das Kind Collection of Original Objects at the Imperial War Museum and  the Für Das Kind International Travelling Exhibition.
The very high winds last week damaged an exhibition also timed to coincide with this event. “Winton’s Trains” was due to have opened for a month in the Bishopsgate entrance to the station. It is currently being rescheduled details here http://www.wintonstrain.com/
I think we owe it to all concerned, to visit the exhibition as soon as it re-opens.

London Prepares for the Arrival of Another US President

This little building site in the south-west corner of Grosvenor Square in Mayfair will be the site of a celebration on July 4th this year.

The footing for a new statue of Ronald Reagan looks to be complete. The new statue has been paid for by The Ronald Reagan Foundation and is not a US government initiative.

The unveiling is just one event marking the centenary of President Reagan’s birth. Details of other events from the Foundation here. The festivities have been partly sponsored by GE.

The cost of the statue, including  a payment to Westminster City Council for maintenance, is expected to be around £250, 000.

The sculptor of the ten foot bronze is Chas Fagan, this will be his only London work. More, on his website, here.

The statue of President Reagan will join two other Presidents in the Square, Eisenhower and Franklin  D Roosevelt.

The magnificent Roosevelt statue, which dominates the centre of the Square, is the work of William Reid Dick and was unveiled in 1948. The audience for the unveiling by Eleanor Roosevelt and the dedication by U.S. Ambassador Lewis W. Douglas, included the Royal Family, PM Clement Attlee and Sir Winston Churchill.

The remarkable thing about the statue was the way it was funded. Individual members of the British public responded to a radio appeal. Such was the public grief in Britain over Roosevelt’s death that 160,000 individuals purchased a small souvenir brochure for 5 Shillings, equivalent to 25p. It took just six days from the first appeal to raise all the funds and that in a country still on rationing.

I wonder, if the Reagan Foundation had adopted a similar fund-raising strategy, just how long it would have taken to raise the funds for their new memorial?